Hunting in

GMU 471 - Pitkin County

GMU 471 - Pitkin County

Early seasons find elk anywhere from 7500ft to above timberline. With increased hunting pressure and snow, herds tend to move to remote areas or private landsÑaway from roads and hunters.

78 /100
GMU 60 - Mesa and Montrose Counties

GMU 60 - Mesa and Montrose Counties

The elk population is healthy, but success is dependent on the weather in Utah. Harvest success is better in the later seasons and away from roads, with animals being found near Carpenter Ridge, Buckeye Reservoir, and John Brown Canyon.

77 /100
GMU 27 - Grand and Routt Counties

GMU 27 - Grand and Routt Counties

Elk are well distributed in all Middle Park units. Bull to cow ratios are good because the area is fairly steep and heavily timbered. Generally, trophy bulls are rare (a few are taken every year) because bulls are managed for hunter opportunity.

77 /100
GMU 15 - Routt, Grand, and Eagle Counties

GMU 15 - Routt, Grand, and Eagle Counties

Large elk numbers occur on the Routt National Forest. The basic movement is from the higher to lower elevation in response to hunting pressure and weather. Hunt the timber and hunt the Routt National Forest early.

73 /100
GMU 70 - Dolores, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties

GMU 70 - Dolores, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties

The elk population is holding steady and herds are at objective levels. You'll find them distributed widely throughout the eastern portion of the unit. Elk will move quickly into thick aspen, evergreens and rugged terrain with hunting pressure.

72 /100
GMU 147 - Las Animas County

GMU 147 - Las Animas County

The elevation in this area ranges from 5,801 feet to 4,429 feet. The terrain is Flat to steep rocky canyons. The vegetation consists of Shortgrass prairie, piñons, juniper, cottonwood riparian.

72 /100
GMU 371 - Summit County

GMU 371 - Summit County

Elk are well distributed in all Middle Park units. Bull to cow ratios are good because the area is fairly steep and heavily timbered. Generally, trophy bulls are rare (a few are taken every year) because bulls are managed for hunter opportunity.

72 /100
GMU 47 - Eagle and Pitkin Counties

GMU 47 - Eagle and Pitkin Counties

Early seasons find elk anywhere from 7500ft to above timberline. With increased hunting pressure and snow, herds tend to move to remote areas or private lands - away from roads and hunters.

72 /100
GMU 171 - Jackson County

GMU 171 - Jackson County

Elk are distributed evenly throughout this unit. During the day, the bulls will be in dark timber - glass in the early morning and evening.

71 /100
GMU 21 - Rio Blanco and Garfield Counties

GMU 21 - Rio Blanco and Garfield Counties

71 /100
GMU 120 - Lincoln, Crowley, and Kiowa Counties

GMU 120 - Lincoln, Crowley, and Kiowa Counties

The elevation in this area ranges from 5,296 to 4,282 feet. The terrain consists of flat to gently rolling hills. The vegetation consists of short grass prairie with interspersed farmland and limited cottonwood riparian.

70 /100
GMU 16 - Jackson County

GMU 16 - Jackson County

Elk are distributed evenly throughout these units. During the day, the bulls will be in dark timberÑglass in the early morning and evening. The herd tends to stay in the coniferous timbered areas until late in the season.

70 /100
GMU 14 - Routt and Grand Counties

GMU 14 - Routt and Grand Counties

Elk are plentiful throughout the Upper Yampa area. Licenses are also readily available, but hunters should not rely on leftover license availability as these herds approach population objective.

70 /100
GMU 512 - El Paso County

GMU 512 - El Paso County

Very few elk occur in this unit. So, you'll probably want to look elsewhere. However, a limited number of cow elk licenses are available.

70 /100
GMU 7 - Larimer County

GMU 7 - Larimer County

Elk summer range generally includes areas between 9,500 and 11,500 feet in elevation. These areas usually become available to elk as snowlines recede in mid to late May. The majority of elk in this area winter at elevations between 7,000 and 9,500 feet.

70 /100
GMU 34 - Garfield and Eagle Counties

GMU 34 - Garfield and Eagle Counties

Successful hunters avoid the main roads and hunt the dark timber and deeper canyons. c

69 /100
GMU 11 - Moffat and Rio Blanco Counties

GMU 11 - Moffat and Rio Blanco Counties

The large elk herd occupies all available habitat. The later seasons are usually better, especially on public land, due to snow and hunting pressure pushing the elk out of the adjacent units. The success rate is very good on late cow elk hunts.

69 /100
GMU 79 - Mineral, Rio Grande, and Saguache Counties

GMU 79 - Mineral, Rio Grande, and Saguache Counties

Elk hunting is good but requires hunters to pursue animals in challenging terrain. Overall success rates for elk hunters in unlimited units in the San Luis Valley are generally lower than the statewide average.

68 /100
GMU 68 - Saguache County

GMU 68 - Saguache County

Elk hunting is good but requires hunters to pursue animals in challenging terrain. Overall, success rates for elk hunters in unlimited units in the San Luis Valley are generally lower than the statewide average. Weather is a dominant factor for hunters.

68 /100
GMU 161 - Jackson County

GMU 161 - Jackson County

The herd tends to stay in the coniferous timbered areas until late in the season, moving to lower elevations with snow and hunting pressure.

68 /100
Showing 1 — 20 of 157 results