Hunting in

GMU 19 - Larimer County

GMU 19 - Larimer County

Elk summer range generally includes areas between 9,500 and 11,500 feet in elevation. These areas usually become available to elk as snowlines recede in mid to late May. The majority of elk in this area winter at elevations between 7,000 and 9,500 feet.

71 /100
GMU 15 - Routt, Grand, and Eagle Counties

GMU 15 - Routt, Grand, and Eagle Counties

Large elk numbers occur on the Routt National Forest. The basic movement is from the higher to lower elevation in response to hunting pressure and weather. Hunt the timber and hunt the Routt National Forest early.

71 /100
GMU 371 - Summit County

GMU 371 - Summit County

Elk are well distributed in all Middle Park units. Bull to cow ratios are good because the area is fairly steep and heavily timbered. Generally, trophy bulls are rare (a few are taken every year) because bulls are managed for hunter opportunity.

71 /100
GMU 18 - Grand County

GMU 18 - Grand County

Elk are well distributed in all Middle Park units. Bull to cow ratios are good because the area is fairly steep and heavily timbered. Generally, trophy bulls are rare (a few are taken every year) because bulls are managed for hunter opportunity.

71 /100
GMU 24 - Rio Blanco and Garfield Counties

GMU 24 - Rio Blanco and Garfield Counties

Generally, this unit is considered very good elk hunting. They are generally at higher elevations in the eastern portions the unit during early seasons, and move west to lower elevations (and private lands) as hunting pressure and snow depth increase. Try

70 /100
GMU 7 - Larimer County

GMU 7 - Larimer County

Elk summer range generally includes areas between 9,500 and 11,500 feet in elevation. These areas usually become available to elk as snowlines recede in mid to late May. The majority of elk in this area winter at elevations between 7,000 and 9,500 feet.

70 /100
GMU 11 - Moffat and Rio Blanco Counties

GMU 11 - Moffat and Rio Blanco Counties

The large elk herd occupies all available habitat. The later seasons are usually better, especially on public land, due to snow and hunting pressure pushing the elk out of the adjacent units. The success rate is very good on late cow elk hunts.

69 /100
GMU 231 - Routt, Rio Blanco, and Garfield Counties

GMU 231 - Routt, Rio Blanco, and Garfield Counties

Elk are plentiful throughout the Upper Yampa area. Licenses are also readily available, but hunters should not rely on leftover license availability as these herds approach population objective. CPW has been working to minimize crop damage and significant

69 /100
GMU 181 - Grand County

GMU 181 - Grand County

Elk are well distributed in all Middle Park units. Bull to cow ratios are good because the area is fairly steep and heavily timbered. Generally, trophy bulls are rare (a few are taken every year) because bulls are managed for hunter opportunity.

67 /100
GMU 25 - Garfield and Eagle Counties

GMU 25 - Garfield and Eagle Counties

Successful hunters avoid the main roads and hunt the dark timber and deeper canyons.

67 /100
GMU 161 - Jackson County

GMU 161 - Jackson County

The herd tends to stay in the coniferous timbered areas until late in the season, moving to lower elevations with snow and hunting pressure.

67 /100
GMU 30 - Garfield and Mesa Counties

GMU 30 - Garfield and Mesa Counties

66 /100
GMU 34 - Garfield and Eagle Counties

GMU 34 - Garfield and Eagle Counties

Successful hunters avoid the main roads and hunt the dark timber and deeper canyons. c

66 /100
GMU 37 - Summit and Grand Counties

GMU 37 - Summit and Grand Counties

Elk are well distributed in all Middle Park units. Bull to cow ratios are good because the area is fairly steep and heavily timbered. Generally, trophy bulls are rare (a few are taken every year) because bulls are managed for hunter opportunity.

66 /100
GMU 14 - Routt and Grand Counties

GMU 14 - Routt and Grand Counties

Elk are plentiful throughout the Upper Yampa area. Licenses are also readily available, but hunters should not rely on leftover license availability as these herds approach population objective.

66 /100
GMU 43 - Garfield, Pitkin, Eagle, and Gunnison Counties

GMU 43 - Garfield, Pitkin, Eagle, and Gunnison Counties

With increased hunting pressure and snow, herds tend to move to remote areas or private lands - away from roads and hunters. The wilderness areas are a good bet for success but hunters must hike or horseback as motorized travel is prohibited.

66 /100
GMU 481 - Chaffee County

GMU 481 - Chaffee County

Look for elk throughout the unit primarily in the 8,000 to 10,000-foot elevation range. Elk are generally at or above above timberline in the areas around Frenchman Creek, east face of Mt. Princeton and the Heckendorf State Wildlife Area.

66 /100
GMU 28 - Grand County

GMU 28 - Grand County

Elk are well distributed in all Middle Park units. Bull to cow ratios are good because the area is fairly steep and heavily timbered. Generally, trophy bulls are rare (a few are taken every year) because bulls are managed for hunter opportunity.

65 /100
GMU 65 - Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, and Ouray Counties

GMU 65 - Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, and Ouray Counties

Hunting prospects are generally very good. Because of the extent of wilderness area in these units, elk find plenty of lush meadows for summer grazing. The elk will stay high until hunting pressure or weather force them down.

65 /100
GMU 8 - Larimer County

GMU 8 - Larimer County

Elk summer range generally includes areas between 9,500 and 11,500 feet in elevation. These areas usually become available to elk as snowlines recede in mid to late May. The majority of elk in this area winter at elevations between 7,000 and 9,500 feet.

65 /100
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