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C

C

73 /100
X9a

X9a

The deer population in Zone X-9a is considered stable to slightly declining, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. The deer herds found within the boundaries of Zone X-9a are the Round Valley (southern portion ...

72 /100
D14

D14

The deer population in Zone D-14 is considered stable to slightly declining, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. These long-term declines have been due to land management practices that have precluded fire, resulting in ch...

72 /100
D13

D13

The deer population in Zone D-13 is considered stable to slightly declining, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. These long-term declines have been due to land management practices that have precluded fire, resulting in ch...

71 /100
D17

D17

The deer population in Zone D-17 is considered stable. The subspecies of deer inhabiting Zone D-17 includes a of mixture Rocky Mountain mule deer, California mule deer, and Southern mule deer that were translocated into the Providence Mountains area fr...

70 /100
X10

X10

The deer population in Zone X-10 is considered stable, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. They reside on their summer ranges until they are stimulated to migrate down slope to their wintering habitats. If thos...

70 /100
X5b

X5b

The deer population in Zone X-5b is at low density and considered stable to slightly declining, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. This downward movement often occurs during the hunting season, so hunters s...

69 /100
D9

D9

The deer population in Zone D-9 is considered stable, although populations are still considerably below those seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. These long-term declines have been due to land management practices that have precluded fire, resulting in...

68 /100
D12

D12

Population trends for the deer herd in Zone D-12 are generally stable. Deer are usually dispersed throughout the zone, but are most commonly found in washes that contain ironwood, and palo verde vegetation.

66 /100
X8

X8

The deer population in Zone X-8 is considered stable to slightly declining, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. Short-term fluctuations in deer populations are usually attributed to weather events that affect...

64 /100
X5a

X5a

The deer population in Zone X-5a is at low density and considered stableto slightly declining, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. The downward movement often occurs during the hunting season, so hunters sho...

64 /100
X9b

X9b

The deer population in Zone X-9b is considered stable to slightly increasing. The subspecies of deer inhabiting Zone X-9b is the Inyo mule deer. Whitney (14,496 feet), can be found in this zone. The winter range consists of sagebrush scrub...

64 /100
X2

X2

The deer population in Zone X-2 is considered stableto slightly declining, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. These large migrations generally occur after stormy weather. This downward movement often occurs ...

63 /100
Goodale Zone (Owens Valley Tule Elk Hunt)

Goodale Zone (Owens Valley Tule Elk Hunt)

62 /100
D11

D11

The deer population in Zone D-11 is considered stable to slightly declining, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. These long-term declines have been due to land management practices that have precluded fire, resulting in ch...

62 /100
X12

X12

The deer population in Zone X-12 is considered to be stable to slightly decreasing, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. The subspecies of deer inhabiting Zone X-12 is the Rocky Mountain mule deer. Deer migrati...

61 /100
X3a

X3a

The deer population in Zone X-3a is considered stable to slightly declining, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. This downward movement often occurs during the hunting season, so hunters should be prepared ...

60 /100
X1

X1

The deer population in Zone X-1 is considered stable to slightly declining, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. This downward movement often occurs during the hunting season, so hunters should be prepared to move to lower ...

60 /100
X6b

X6b

The deer population in Zone X-6b is at low density and considered stable to slightly declining, yet considerably below levels seen in the late 1960's and 1970's. Typically, lower densities of deer are observed in the more densely forested...

59 /100
X9c

X9c

The deer population in Zone X-9c is considered to be slightly declining. No major deer migration route has been delineated in either the Inyo or White Mountains. To a lesser extent, this is also the case in the Inyo Mountains. Temperatures and snow con...

59 /100
Showing 1 — 20 of 51 results