Hunting in

GMU 46 - Clear Creek, Park, and Jefferson Counties

GMU 46 - Clear Creek, Park, and Jefferson Counties

Most low to mid elevation elk ranges are on private land or parks and open space lands that are generally are not open to hunting. Most public land hunting is at the mid to high elevation ranges.

65 /100
GMU 26 - Garfield, Eagle, and Routt Counties

GMU 26 - Garfield, Eagle, and Routt Counties

Successful hunters avoid the main roads and hunt the dark timber and deeper canyons.

65 /100
GMU 85 - Huerfano, Las Animas, and Trinidad Counties

GMU 85 - Huerfano, Las Animas, and Trinidad Counties

Better elk hunting is in the Silver Mountain area, west and southwest of La Veta. Good population in Apishapa River drainage but is on private land. Earlier season areas include Cross Mountain and Huerfano River drainage.

65 /100
GMU 66 - Gunnison, Hinsdale, and Saguache Counties

GMU 66 - Gunnison, Hinsdale, and Saguache Counties

Elk populations remain strong throughout the Gunnison Basin. Aggressive herd reduction during the 2012 and 2013 seasons was implemented to address agricultural damage issues. Subsequently, there has been a noticeable decline in the population which has re

65 /100
GMU 73 - Montezuma County

GMU 73 - Montezuma County

The elk population is holding steady and herds are at objective levels. Animals are distributed widely throughout the eastern portion of these units. Elk will move quickly into thick aspen, evergreens and rugged terrain with hunting pressure.

64 /100
GMU 38 - Gilpin, Boulder, Clear Creek, and Jefferson Counties

GMU 38 - Gilpin, Boulder, Clear Creek, and Jefferson Counties

Elk herds within the Central Front Range are either residential or seasonally migratory. Residential herds are found year-round at low to moderate elevations. Migratory herds generally winter below 9,000 feet.

64 /100
GMU 80 - Alamosa, Conejos, Mineral, and Rio Grande Counties

GMU 80 - Alamosa, Conejos, Mineral, and Rio Grande Counties

Elk hunting is good but requires hunters to pursue animals in challenging terrain. Elk and deer move to areas of rough terrain hidden from roads when the season starts. Hunting quality is good, especially in early seasons before winter weather arrives.

64 /100
GMU 40 - Mesa County

GMU 40 - Mesa County

Bulls will be bugling from mid-Sept through 1st rifle opening weekend. Elk are widely distributed. Most stay high until hunting pressure pushes them to lower elevations and less accessible drainages.

64 /100
GMU 13 - Moffat and Routt Counties

GMU 13 - Moffat and Routt Counties

Elk are plentiful throughout the Upper Yampa area. Licenses are also readily available, but hunters should not rely on leftover license availability as these herds approach population objective.

63 /100
GMU 521 - Gunnison and Delta Counties

GMU 521 - Gunnison and Delta Counties

The herd is growing, well distributed and hunting is rated as good. Most elk will be at higher elevations during the early seasons above 8,500 feet in thick timber and oak brush. Distribution changes in relation to weather and hunting pressure.

63 /100
GMU 461 - Jefferson and Park Counties

GMU 461 - Jefferson and Park Counties

Most low to mid elevation elk ranges are on private land or parks and open space lands that are generally are not open to hunting. Most public land hunting is at the mid to high elevation ranges.

63 /100
GMU 2 - Moffat County

GMU 2 - Moffat County

Big, 300+ size bulls are common. The elk tend to stay put over the seasons. Movement is weather dependent. Overall, elk are scattered throughout the unit. Hold out for a good bull as the average size is around 305.

63 /100
GMU 29 - Boulder, Jefferson, and Gilpin Counties

GMU 29 - Boulder, Jefferson, and Gilpin Counties

Most low to mid elevation elk ranges are on private land or parks and open space lands that are generally are not open to hunting. Most public land hunting is at the mid to high elevation ranges.

63 /100
GMU 81 - Alamosa, Archuleta, Conejos, and Rio Grande Counties

GMU 81 - Alamosa, Archuleta, Conejos, and Rio Grande Counties

Elk hunting is good but requires hunters to pursue animals in challenging terrain. Overall success rates for elk hunters in unlimited units in the San Luis Valley are generally lower than the statewide average. Weather is a dominant factor for hunters.

62 /100
GMU 71 - Dolores and Montezuma Counties

GMU 71 - Dolores and Montezuma Counties

The elk population is holding steady and herds are at objective levels. Animals are distributed widely throughout the eastern portion of the unit. Elk will move quickly into thick aspen, evergreens, and rugged terrain with hunting pressure.

62 /100
GMU 78 - Archuleta, Conejos, Mineral, and Rio Grande Counties

GMU 78 - Archuleta, Conejos, Mineral, and Rio Grande Counties

Hunters must be prepared to walk into remote and forested areas. Do not expect to see elk from roads or areas open to OHVs. In early seasons stick to cool areas on north-facing slopes in the spruce/fir and aspen forests.

62 /100
GMU 61 - Mesa, Montrose, Ouray, and San Miguel Counties

GMU 61 - Mesa, Montrose, Ouray, and San Miguel Counties

Elk are widely distributed, but hunting pressure during the early seasons appears to be forcing animals from GMU 62 to GMU 61 which is a totally limited unit.

62 /100
GMU 171 - Jackson County

GMU 171 - Jackson County

Elk are distributed evenly throughout this unit. During the day, the bulls will be in dark timber - glass in the early morning and evening.

62 /100
GMU 771 - Archileta County

GMU 771 - Archileta County

Hunters must be prepared to walk into remote and forested areas. Do not expect to see elk from roads or areas open to OHVs. In early seasons stick to cool areas on north-facing slopes in the spruce/fir and aspen forests.

61 /100
GMU 54 - Gunnison County

GMU 54 - Gunnison County

Hunters are advised to be in good shape and to hunt well away from roads. Elk will move to difficult terrain when hunting pressure starts; so be prepared to hunt canyons or thick timber.

61 /100
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