Deer Hunting in Idaho Unit 63 (Controlled Hunt Oppty.): Snake River Zone

The Snake River DAU has GMUs in both eastern and western Idaho, but these GMUs share common characteristics. Land ownership is a mix of federal, state, tribal, and private and includes Craters of the Moon National Monument in GMU 68 and Idaho National ...

Unit 63 (Controlled Hunt Oppty.): Snake River Zone

Scores


Ease of Drawing
0
 
N/A
Success
15
 
15
Trophy Potential
25
 
25
Public Access
29
 
29
Ease of Terrain
100
 
100
Room to Breathe
47
 
47
Opportunity
0
 
N/A
Convenience
2
 
2
Ease of Effort
50
 
50
44
HuntScore

Access Notes


Bureau of Land Management
US Forest Service
US Fish and Wildlife Service
US Forest Service National Grasslands
Indian Reservation
State, County, City; Park and Outdoor Recreation Areas
State Wildlife/Wilderness Areas
Bureau of Reclaimation
Department of the Defense
National Park Service
State
Other Federal Land
Private

Land Ownership
Legend


Size

1,985 Square Miles (1,270,675 Acres)

Land Ownership

36% Private, 65% Public, 21% BLM, 8% State, 36% Other

Latitude/Longitude

43.6908, -112.5135

Amenities

There are 0 hospitals, 1 hotels, 0 campgrounds, and 0 grocery stores within a 20 mile radius.

Deer Notes


The Snake River DAU has GMUs in both eastern and western Idaho, but these GMUs share common characteristics. Land ownership is a mix of federal, state, tribal, and private and includes Craters of the Moon National Monument in GMU 68 and Idaho National Laboratory in GMU 63. Unit 38 includes the Treasure Valley, the largest urban area in Idaho. Mule deer in this DAU are generally year-round residents and densities are low.

Habitats are characterized by low elevations and limited precipitation, with deer tending to favor river corridors and irrigated agriculture. Deer depredation in agricultural areas has been a management priority. Mule deer hunting opportunity is liberal. Mule deer populations are currently monitored and managed with harvest metrics and measures of conflicts with agriculture.

No additional data collection in this DAU is anticipated over the life of this Plan.. This DAU (GMUs 40, 41, 42, 45, 46, 47,52, 52A, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 63, 66, 66A, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 73A, 74, 75, 76, 77, and 78) represents a wide spectrum of productivity from dry rangeland to irrigated agriculture. High-productivity areas include major riparian areas such as Snake River drainage, irrigated agricultural areas, and high-elevation forests. Predominant vegetation types in this DAU include dry shrub, cool shrub, and agricultural.

Approximately 7% of the DAU is comprised of riparian woodland, riparian shrub, and cold forest vegetation types. Current vegetation communities are a result of agricultural practices, fire suppression, and urban development. Riparian areas shrank and became fragmented due to development and grazing practices. Frequency of landscape-level fires has increased throughout this DAU and influenced vegetation communities towards noxious annuals.

Approximately 58% of land in this DAU is publicly owned. The BLM administers the majority of public lands, whereas USFS and IDL administer nearly equal amounts of remaining public land. Other significant non-private ownership consists of Department of Energy land (primarily Idaho National Laboratory) and Bureau of Indian Affairs land, primarily Fort Hall and Duck Valley reservations. Approximately 34% of the DAU is comprised of private land.

Rangeland is the predominant land use, comprising approximately 59% of the DAU. Other significant land uses include dryland agriculture, irrigated agriculture, and forest lands. White-tailed deer distribution has slowly increased over the past several decades in this DAU. Movement along riparian corridors expanded white-tailed deer distribution and population numbers have increased in some areas.

White-tailed deer populations have potential to increase with improved irrigation technology and conversion to agricultural commodities. White-tailed deer remain uncommon and are secondary to mule deer with regard to hunter preference.

HuntScore Tip

The quality of your hunt depends on you. Preseason scouting, preparation for the environmental conditions, and physical conditioning are important factors. The success and quality of your hunt will likely increase with the distance from your vehicle and roads.

State Agency Website

Visit Idaho Fish and Game

Other Species in Unit

Shiras Moose, Elk,

Photos and Terrain Notes


Unit Elevation Profile

HuntScore generates thousands of synthetic hikes in the unit to create an elevation profile. This profile is what you can expect to experience within a 2 mile hike from a road or trail in this unit.

Elevation in this unit ranges from 4442' to 6358' with a median elevation of 4839'. If you are preparing to hunt this unit you should train for hiking up and down slopes of 1.1%.

Distribution of Slopes From Hikes
Common Slope

This is typical incline or decline experienced while hiking from a road or trail in the unit

Elevation Range
Max Elevation: 6358'
Median Elevation: 4839'
Min Elevation: 4442'

Common Elevation Profiles

Deer Over The Counter Hunts (2020)


Below are OTC hunts available for Unit 63 (Controlled Hunt Oppty.): Snake River Zone.
Residency Species Deer Sex Manner Season Type Dates Notes
RSNRS
E
A
A
OTC
all muzzleloader seasons: 08/30 - 09/3, /fall: 08/30 - 09/3, /all muzzleloader seasons: 11/1 - 12/19, /fall: 11/1 - 12/19
RSNRS
E
A
A
OTC
all muzzleloader seasons: 08/30 - 09/3, /fall: 08/30 - 09/3, /all muzzleloader seasons: 11/1 - 12/19, /fall: 11/1 - 12/19 Antlered Date: Aug 30 - Sep 30 ; Antlerless Date: Aug 30 - Sep 30 ; Motorized Hunting Rule Applies in Units 66 & 69, See Pages 104 - 106
RSNRS
E
SR
G
OTC
all muzzleloader seasons: 10/10 - 10/2, /fall: 10/10 - 10/2, /all muzzleloader seasons: 10/10 - 10/3, /fall: 10/10 - 10/3

Deer Harvest Stats (2019)


Total Hunters
453
Total Harvest
51
Harvest Male
45
Harvest Female
7
11%
Average Success
Manner Season Type Sex Deer Species Hunters Harvest Male Female Youth Success Rate Days Hunter
A
G
N/A N/A 201 22
22
10.7% 6
ALL
ALL
N/A N/A 453 51
45
7
11% 6
ALL
G
N/A N/A 453 51
45
7
11.3% 6
Any
G
N/A N/A 300 30
23
7
9.9% 4
M
G
N/A N/A 10 0
0% 4
HuntScore Tip: Ever hunt a unit with a 100% success rate and not see any animals? If you're nodding your head to any of these scenarios then you're one of the people who knows that statistics are a good guide, but they aren't a guarantee.

Harvests Trends


Overall harvests trends are broken down by hunt_code, manner, season, sex, type, and species of deer (if applicable) to the extent state wildlife managers provide such data.

Total Harvest

Success Rate

Days Per Hunter (To Harvest)

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